Surrogacy in Abuja

IN VITRO FERTILIZATION A SOLUTION TO INFERTILITY?

In 1984, Dr. Oladapo Ashiru and his team successfully delivered the first baby via In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in Nigeria. This was six years after the birth of Louise Brown in 1978, the first baby in the world conceived via IVF. Over six million babies has been conceived using IVF. It is often looked upon as a last resort, when other forms of ART (Assisted Reproductive Techniques), has failed.

WHAT IS IN VITRO FERTILIZATION?

In Vitro Fertilization or IVF as it is more commonly referred to is a form of assisted reproductive technique. IVF helps with fertilization, embryo development and implantation. In IVF, fertilization takes place outside the body. The ovum (egg) is extracted from the female. A sperm sample is retrieved from the male also. The egg and the sperm sample is then manually combined in a laboratory. Once fertilization takes place and the embryo has developed to a certain stage, the embryo is the transferred to the uterus and in most cases normal development takes place and the female gives birth to a perfectly healthy baby.

IVF may be considered if either partners have been diagnosed with;

  • This is when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in other places in the body outside the womb
  • Low sperm count
  • Antibody problems that harm sperm or eggs
  • Inability of sperm to penetrate or survive in the cervical mucus
  • Poor egg quality
  • An unexplained fertility problem etc.

In Nigeria tubal factors and low sperm count are the leading causes of infertility. One in four Nigerian couples experience infertility.

In earlier times children conceived through the IVF procedure were often referred to as “test tube babies”. One of the myths was that babies born via this procedure were often not “normal”. This is completely false.

 

IVF Success Rate

While the success rate with IVF is a little below 50%, this reduces as the female ages, the babies delivered are healthy and normal. To increase the chances of pregnancy, Doctors transfer 3-10 eggs back into the uterus depending on the age of the female, quality of the eggs etc.  Advances in technology has greatly improved the chances of IVF procedures making it safer and an option for couples finding it difficult to conceive.

Consult us at EL RAPHA HOSPITALS AND DIAGNOSTICS  which is on of the best fertility hospital in Nigeria today as we have a medical team of professionals that will offer guidance, support and professionalism should you opt for an IVF procedure.

 

To contact a patient or for patient room information, call: (+234) 909 888 9013, 90998889015

General: 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Family members with an ID badge have 24-hour access to the hospital.

Address

  • El-Rapha Hospitals and Diagnostics Plot #930 Salihu Iliyasu Street, Life Camp, Abuja, Nigeria.

GESTATIONAL DIABETES (GDM)

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. In other words, gestational diabetes is diabetes detected during pregnancy.

Most women are screened for gestational diabetes at 24-28 weeks gestation period during antenatal care. Sometimes, your doctor may screen you earlier if they have concerns. GDM is caused by hormonal changes associated inherently with actual pregnancy and can affect between 5% and 15%; globally, 1 in 7 women suffer from it.

SYMPTOMS

Patients do not usually notice any symptoms of gestational diabetes because the routine tests performed during pregnancy help identify the condition very early on.

Nevertheless, if it is not detected early, then the patient could notice symptoms associated with increased sugar levels (hyperglycaemia) such as an excessive weight gain by gestational age, thirst and increased urge to urinate.

RISK FACTORS * If you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy
• If you’ve had a baby born weighing over 4kg
• If you are obese or overweight
• If you have a family history of diabetes.
• If you are being treated for HIV.

HOW BAD IS GESTATIONAL DIABETES?

1. It increases your risk of having type2 diabetes
2. You are more likely to have a large baby; this may cause discomfort during the last few months of pregnancy and this may lead to a cesarean section (C-section)
3. Prolonged labour

4. Pre-eclampsia

5. Postpartum haemorrhageCAN GESTATIONAL DIABETES BE PREVENTED?
Yes. Before getting pregnant, talk to your doctor about how to reduce your risk of gestational diabetes before becoming pregnant.

• Be physically active—Get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity five days a week.
• Eat a variety of foods that are low in fat and reduce your calorie intake per day.
• Maintain a healthy weight.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU ALREADY HAVE GDM

• Show up at all your prenatal visits.
• Follow your doctor’s recommendations on controlling your blood sugar. This can help reduce your risk of having a large baby.
• Stay physically active.
• Eat healthy food

You can reduce your chances of having gestational diabetes in the future by asking your doctor about type 2 diabetes prevention and care after delivery. You could also ask to see a dietitian or a diabetes educator to learn more about type 2 diabetes prevention.

Exercise during Pregnancy Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy?

We talked a little about exercise in pregnancy in the previous post, you can check it out before getting into this. This post continues to answer the other questions you might have.

WHAT CHANGES OCCUR IN THE BODY DURING PREGNANCY THAT CAN AFFECT MY EXERCISE ROUTINE?

Your body goes through many changes during pregnancy. It is important to choose exercises that take these changes into account:

  • Joints— the hormones made during pregnancy cause the ligaments that support your joints to become relaxed. This makes the joints more mobile and at risk of injury. Avoid jerky, bouncy, or high-impact motions that can increase your risk of being hurt.
  • Balance— during pregnancy, the extra weight in the front of your body shifts your centre of gravity. This places stress on joints and muscles, especially those in your pelvis and low back. Because you are less stable and more likely to lose your balance, you are at greater risk of falling.
  • Breathing—when you exercise, oxygen and blood flow are directed to your muscles and away from other areas of your body. While you are pregnant, your need for oxygen increases. As your belly grows, you may become short of breath more easily because of increased pressure of the uterus on the diaphragm (a muscle that aids in breathing). These changes may affect your ability to do strenuous exercise, especially if you are overweight or obese.

WHAT PRECAUTIONS SHOULD I TAKE WHEN EXERCISING DURING PREGNANCY?

There are a few precautions that pregnant women should keep in mind during exercise:

  • Drink plenty of water before, during, and after your workout. Signs of dehydration include dizziness, a racing or pounding heart, and urinating only small amounts or having urine that is dark yellow.
  • Wear a sports bra that gives lots of support to help protect your breasts. Later in pregnancy, a belly support belt may reduce discomfort while walking or running.
  • Avoid becoming overheated, especially in the first trimester. Drink plenty of water, wear loose-fitting clothing, and exercise in a temperature-controlled room. Do not exercise outside when it is very hot or humid.
  • Avoid standing still or lying flat on your back as much as possible. When you lie on your back, your uterus presses on a large vein that returns blood to the heart. Standing motionless can cause blood to pool in your legs and feet. Both of these positions can decrease the amount of blood returning to your heart and may cause your blood pressure to decrease for a short time.

WHAT ARE SOME SAFE EXERCISES I CAN DO DURING PREGNANCY?

Whether you are new to exercise or it already is part of your weekly routine, choose activities that experts agree are safest for pregnant women:

  • Walking—brisk walking gives a total body workout and is easy on the joints and muscles.
  • Swimming and water workouts— Water workouts use many of the body’s muscles. The water supports your weight so you avoid injury and muscle strain. If you find brisk walking difficult because of low back pain, water exercise is a good way to stay active.
  • Stationary bicycling—because your growing belly can affect your balance and make you more prone to falls, riding a standard bicycle during pregnancy can be risky. Cycling on a stationary bike is a better choice.
  • Modified yoga and modified Pilates—Yoga reduces stress, improves flexibility, and encourages stretching and focused breathing. There are even prenatal yoga and Pilates classes designed for pregnant women. These classes often teach modified poses that accommodate a pregnant woman’s shifting balance. You also should avoid poses that require you to be still or lie on your back for long periods.

If you are an experienced runner, jogger, or racquet-sports player, you may be able to keep doing these activities during pregnancy. Discuss these activities with your health care professional before getting into them.

Glossary

Anaemia: Abnormally low levels of blood or red blood cells in the bloodstream. Most cases are caused by iron deficiency or lack of iron.

Cerclage: A procedure in which the cervical opening is closed with stitches in order to prevent or delay preterm birth.

Cervical Insufficiency: Inability of the cervix to retain a pregnancy in the second trimester.

Caesarean Delivery: Delivery of a baby through surgical incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus.

Complications: Diseases or conditions that occur as a result of another disease or condition. An example is pneumonia that occurs as a result of the flu. A complication also can occur as a result of a condition, such as pregnancy. An example of a pregnancy complication is preterm labour.

Deep Vein Thrombosis: A condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein in the leg or other areas of the body.

Dehydration: A condition that results from loss of water from the body.

Gestational Diabetes: Diabetes that arises during pregnancy.

Hormones: Substances made in the body by cells or organs that control the function of other cells or organs. An example is an oestrogen, which controls the function of female reproductive organs.

Oxygen: A gas that is necessary to sustain life.

Placenta Previa: A condition in which the placenta lies very low in the uterus so that the opening of the uterus is partially or completely covered.

Preeclampsia: A disorder that can occur during pregnancy or after childbirth in which there are high blood pressure and other signs of organ injury, such as an abnormal amount of protein in the urine, a low number of platelets, abnormal kidney or liver function, pain over the upper abdomen, fluid in the lungs, or a severe headache or changes in vision.

Preterm: Born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy.

Uterus: A muscular organ located in the female pelvis that contains and nourishes the developing foetus during pregnancy.

 

Culled from the ACOG website