Frequently Asked Questions about In Vitro Fertilization

You may have many doubts about the IVF process. They range from the side effects of the stimulation to when you need to give yourself the treatment, to questions about how to relieve the stress experienced during this time or what type of vitamins to take. El-rapha fertility experts and team will guide you through this process and point you in the right direction at all times.In addition, we provide you some key points such as, advice on IVF treatment, the practice on how to put the estrogen patches during stimulation or if necessary, to do an ultrasound of the endometrium before an embryo transfer. There are too many questions about IVF that patients have in their minds.

Here are some of common IVF FAQs ?
Below are the IVF frequently asked questions which patients usually ask our fertility experts at El-rapha Hospital.

1. When is the right time to start treatment for in vitro fertilization (IVF)?

Your doctor will explain the best time to start treatment after the initial consultation, examination and blood tests.
Your clinician may start your treatment on the 2nd or 3rd day of your period.

2. How much does the IVF treatment cost?
The cost of IVF at El-rapha or anywhere across the globe is initially dependent on the infertility workup of the couple.
Hence it varies from person to person. This is one of the most common IVF frequently asked questions.

3. Can we have our tests done at a nearby clinic as we live in a far rural area?
As long as we are in close contact with the clinician having your tests done at a clinic near you, then it is feasible.

4. How many times can we try IVF?
A couple can try as many times as they want, as long as they can handle the costs.

5. What makes IVF an expensive treatment?
This method requires highly qualified personnel and the latest technology equipment’s and facility. The equipment and materials used for an IVF lab are all imported and expensive. In addition, most of the materials used are disposable and in single use format.

6. How long does the Egg collection/ pickup procedure take?
The time duration of this procedure completely upon the number of follicles that are required to be aspirated. Normally, it takes about 5-10 minutes.

7. We have heard that Egg collection process is painful, is it true?
The procedure is not painful, but may cause mild discomfort. At our clinic, we use mild anesthesia administered through an IV route which relieves discomfort. Stressed patients usually ask this FAQ about IVF.

8. How long do I need to rest after the embryo transfer procedure?
Resting 15-20 minutes after the transfer is usually sufficient. We suggest not to do heavy exercise and walking for long distances during this time period. Women who work at an office can work the next day to resume daily activities.

9. Can someone who does not have sperm have children?
There are procedures for men who do not have sperms in their semen. Such procedures include collecting tissue samples directly from the testes in different ways depending on the condition. If sperm is found in these tissue samples, then ICSI can be used to inseminate the eggs.

10. How successful is the IVF treatment?
Success rates strongly depend on the age of the patient, their condition and the treatment used. This IVF FAQ concerns every IVF patient a lot but at El-rapha Hospital, you are free to ask all the questions you want to ask and clear your mind before starting your infertility treatment.

 

Talk to our fertility experts  today for all your pregnancy and fertility-related queries.

Call now: (+234) 909 888 9013,  9098889015

CORONA VIRUS AND PREGNANCY

Frequently asked questions by pregnant women

HOW WILL COVID-19 AFFECT MY PREGANANCY?

Minimal data available as at the writing of this report does not indicate that pregnant women are more at risk than the average healthy person. Majority of pregnant women may have mild to moderate symptoms of the disease.

HOW WILL COVID-19 AFFECT MY UNBORN CHILD?

At this early stage of understanding the new coronavirus, there is no evidence to suggest an increased risk of miscarriage in pregnant women. Emerging data however suggests that transmission of the coronavirus to the baby during pregnancy or birth is probable. In the UK, there have been report of two likely cases but the babies were both discharged and are very well. Previously, reported cases around the world have found infection in at least 32 hours after birth. It is of crucial importance to note that all reported cases of new born babies developing the virus shortly after birth show that the baby is well.

At this point, it is considered unlikely for the virus to affect and inhibit your baby’s development and there is no evidence to the contrary.

In China, there have been a few cases of premature births in infected pregnant women but it is still unclear whether this was triggered by the virus or it was recommended that the baby be delivered early for the safety and health of the mother.

HOW CAN I REDUCE MY RISK OF CORONAVIRUS?

You can reduce your risks by following the federal and international guidelines for pregnant women and everyone else, this includes the following:

  • Wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds or uses alcohol based hand sanitizers
  • Cough or sneeze into elbow or disposable tissue
  • Avoid contact with anyone that exhibits symptoms of coronavirus. This symptoms include high temperature and cough
  • Stay home and avoid unnecessary movement.
  • Practice social distancing
  • Avoid gathering in public spaces like restaurants, religious centers and event places.

WHY ARE PREGNANT WOMEN IN A VUNERABLE GROUP?

Officials have placed pregnant women in this category mainly as a precautionary measure and this should be taken very seriously. Although evidence gathered suggests that pregnant women are not significantly at higher risk than the average healthy individual, pregnancy in a small proportion of women can affect how the body manages several viral infections. This is well known by obstetricians and midwives.

SHOULD I STILL ATTEND ANTENATAL CARE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC?

Yes, it is very important to see to your scheduled appointments with your maternity team.  If you develop symptoms similar to that of the Coronavirus infection, make sure you place a call to your doctor or midwife to postpone all appointments till isolation period is over.

Sourced from WHO, mariestopes.org.ng

Fertility Preservation for Cancer Patients

For  young persons, a cancer diagnosis can be very traumatizing. Treatments that can be lifesaving can also be  life threatening to fertility. At the Elrapha Hospital and Fertility Center, we are available to counsel patients with a new cancer diagnosis regarding the risk their cancer treatments may pose to their fertility processes.

Below, our experts answer commonly asked questions about the impact specific treatments have on fertility and the fertility preservation options we offer, which include embryo, oocyte, ovarian tissue and embryo cryopreservation.

Embryo Cryopreservation

In-vitro fertilization followed by cryopreservation (freezing) of the fertilized eggs can provide an opportunity to have a pregnancy after treatment for cancer is completed. This procedure involves treatment with injectable fertility medications to stimulate development of multiple eggs. The eggs are retrieved in a procedure performed under anesthesia, called an oocyte retrieval, and fertilized with the partner’s (or donor) sperm and then frozen. The whole process generally requires two to four weeks.

IVF with cryopreservation of embryos has been used extensively for infertility treatment since the early 1980s and is considered a safe and routine procedure. The embryos can be stored for a number of years until cancer treatment is completed. Even if the cancer treatment results in ovarian failure, the woman can be given hormones to mimic a normal ovulation cycle and have the embryos transferred back to the uterus by a simple outpatient procedure.

The chance of pregnancy is about 30 to 50 percent each time one to two embryos are returned to the hormonally prepared uterus (pregnancy rate is dependent on maternal age at the time the embryos were created). If several high grade embryos can be produced and stored, that should give the couple a reasonably good chance of achieving a pregnancy at a later date. Sometimes this is not possible because of the need to start cancer treatment quickly. An IVF cycle takes about two weeks to complete, and we can often start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation to harvest eggs on a random day during a woman’s cycle.